Mycestro: The first natural mouse

Mycestro: The first natural mouse

Mycestro

Mycestro: The first natural mouse

Function

Battery life

Features

Summary:
The Mycestro is perfect for the manager who's always doing presentations, or the person who has a small workspace and can't use a dedicated mouse.

77%

Good

User Rating: 0 (0 votes)

The common computer mouse; something that’s been around for ages. You might remember your first mouse, and like mine, it had a little ball underneath it. The tracking was terrible, you had to use a mousepad, it wasn’t that great of an experience. Don’t get me wrong. It was awesome to be able to use a computer, but the experience just wasn’t there. Then optical and ball mice came along (different ball) and tracking got better, but it still wasn’t that amazing. Then we moved even further along; laser mice and mice that had cameras built into them for tracking. We were on the right track (hah, get it?) to getting things more natural, but it was still a ways off. Still, you either used a standard mouse, or you used something similar to a Leap Motion Controller (or Kinect). However, anything other than a standard mouse was expensive, and didn’t work well when not sitting at a desk. Then, along came Mycestro, a new way to browse your computer.

When you hear the term “Mycestro”, what do you think? Personally, I think of music. I think of the conductor standing on stage, waving his baton around as he conducts wonderful music. After reading what Mycestro was, I was curious as to why exactly they chose the name. Then I saw it; then I used it. Keep reading for my full review on why I think the Mycestro could change how we interact with our computers on a day to day basis.

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When first unboxing the Mycestro, I saw this odd looking white thing with a strap, and I wondered what the heck it was. Can this really be a mouse? How the heck does it work? I disregarded all normal thoughts of the mouse sitting on your desk, took Mycestro out, and plugged the dongle in. Why it requires a dongle is beyond me, as it’s just a Bluetooth 4.0 dongle, but regardless, it gets plugged into a USB port and I fired up the Mycestro. Strapping the odd looking finger-mouse-thingy to my index finger (or middle finger, if you roll that way), I then started waving my hand at my computer screen like a madman. It’s confusing at first, but I quickly picked up when to touch the touchpad, which button to click, and how to properly navigate around my two monitors, when one is 32” and one is 15”. After about half an hour to an hour, I asked myself, “Where has this been all my life?” These were my first impressions of the Mycestro, and they’ve not changed since. But how does it work? What exactly does it do? Why should you buy it? The answer to the first two of those questions is simple; I don’t know!

Image credit: Amazon
Image credit: Amazon

After first using Mycestro, I started racking my brain as to how it was tracking my finger. It’s not the most precise, but it gets the job done, that’s for sure. I would just type, lift my hand off the keyboard a bit, and wiggle my index finger. My cursor, well, it would magically move around the screen. It took a while to get used to this new motion, and I reached for the MX Master a few times, but not for long. Using my finger to navigate my screens became second nature, and I wondered why we hadn’t been doing this all along. Why did it take so many years for someone to realize the best way to navigate a computer was with a finger? Clicking on things and scrolling came just as easy. The Mycestro has 3 buttons: right click, middle click, and left click. All exactly where you’d expect them to be. Scrolling? Well, that’s simple, too. You just move your thumb along the touch pad and you scroll up and down, just as naturally as moving your finger to move your mouse. How this little thing you strap to your finger does all this, well, it’s completely beyond me. The tracking is phenomenal for the size of the thing, and there is nothing else on the desktop that’s actually tracking the movement like one would expect. No cameras, no nothing.

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But, does it actually work? one might ask. It does. I love using it at my desk, but honestly, there is no substitute for an actual mouse, at least not yet. This is only version 1 of Mycestro, and I only see it getting better from here. Remember the original optical mice I talked about earlier? That’s how I see Mycestro. It’s awesome! But it’s not quite there, yet. Tracking can still be a tad off, and it still takes some getting used to, but it’s awesome once you’re used to it! The use cases for Mycestro are endless; meeting presentations, graphic design, even gaming! But, they have some things to polish, and I can’t wait until they do. Unlike most wireless mice, though, the Mycestro needs to be charged. Obviously you can’t fit a AAA battery inside of it, as it would take up the entire mouse! It has a built-in rechargeable battery, and recharges via a Micro USB cable, which is included. I found myself only having to recharge it once over around 2 days of usage, which one might think is a lot, but when you consider the size and what it does, I don’t think that’s too often at all.

And one last question remains: to buy or not to buy? It really depends. What do you intend to use Mycestro for? Do you already have a killer desktop mouse? Are you a gamer or graphic designer? You likely won’t benefit from Mycestro a ton. Do you do presentations at work a lot? Always finding yourself trying to do something when standing clear across the room? Well, Mycestro sounds like it’s for you! With a hefty price tag of $149, Mycestro isn’t for the faint of heart when it comes to buying a mouse. Most good gaming mice (or even things like the Logitech MX Master) max out near ~$100, with many more “features” than Mycestro has. But, then again, the Mycestro in and of itself is one big new “feature”, so there’s that.

But, overall, Mycestro is an awesome mouse. It’s really how mice should have been since the beginning, and had mice been designed this way for years, this would be a different review. Personally, I can’t wait for v2, but until then, Mycestro will remain overpriced for me, and will not find its way into my normal workflow. If you’d like to purchase Mycestro, you can do so at the Mycestro store or Amazon, both at $149.

Disclaimer: Mycestro was provided to us for review by SproutUp, but all views expressed are our own. SproutUp is also running a giveaway for Mycestro, and you can view that here

Mycestro

$149
Mycestro
8.375

Usability

9/10

    Battery life

    9/10

      Features

      9/10

        Tracking precision

        8/10

          Pros

          • Don't have to use a normal mouse
          • Can control your computer from across the room
          • Can do presentations very easily

          Cons

          • Tracking can be a tad off
          • Takes a bit to fully learn

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